Apple Mac Studio Is Now Your Custom DaVinci Resolve – Up News Info

We take phone reviews very seriously, both in written and video form. Our Youtube channel has grown to 1.5 million subscribers and we post about three videos per week. To put it into perspective, we produce about 2 hours of video every month and get that video of about 5 hours of B-roll produced by our video team.

So it is very important to have a streamlined workflow. We have strived to continually improve it over the years. We won’t go into too much detail, but we started with Sony’s Vegas editor, struggled for a few years with Adobe’s Premiere, and now mostly settled on DaVinci Resolve as our editor of choice.

Our computers are custom built computers with Nvidia cards. But when Apple’s move to ARM happened and we saw video could work on a better optimized platform, we decided to give it a try.

We first bought the base model MacBook Air with an M1 processor, 7 GPU cores, 8GB of RAM and 256GB of storage. It might not sound like much, but thanks to onboard H.264 and H.265 video codecs, faster unified memory, and DaVinci Resolve’s improvements to the M1 processor, the Air can easily edit 4K video like a computer. Much stronger.

We have produced around 40 videos with MacBook Air so far and we can attest to its advantages as a video editing computer. Although it wasn’t as easy to quantify as the speed, it was its stability and reliability that impressed us the most. For some reason, we’ve had no luck with Windows computers and we’re used to occasional crashes which, while not amazing, are definitely pretty annoying.

Air works, forgive the cliched, and we haven’t had any crashes with DaVinci Resolve since switching to macOS.

But the air is not strong enough to meet our needs. Basic video editing works great, but once we start adding animations, text and title layers, and color corrections, we have to resort not just to half resolution, but turn on at quarter resolution. This makes precise color manipulation difficult. The Air didn’t cut it, so we got a basic Mac Studio, hoping that would give us the best of both worlds.

So why the basic Mac Studio model? Well, it does the job and the price tag is not exorbitant. It comes with M1 Max processor which has 10 CPU cores (8 powerful and 2 efficient), 24 GPU cores, 32GB RAM and 512GB NVME hard drive.Premium retail platform with floating central platform Well-padded Mac Studio rests on during transit, ensuring that nothing happens to it on its way to you.

The M1 Ultra version seems to be just overkill at twice the price – money we thought could be better spent on other parts of the video production process.

Our device retail package includes 1 Braided Power Cable and 1 Black Apple Sticker.


Unboxing Mac Studio

Unboxing Mac Studio

Unboxing Mac Studio

It also comes with ports, and we love the ports. We’re going to hook up a keyboard and mouse to the air, and we’ll have a dongle that allows an SD card slot and an HDMI connection for an external monitor. Mac Studio has all of these ports, plus 4 Thunderbolt 4 USB-C ports, 2 full-size USB-A ports, 2 additional USB-C ports on the front, and an Ethernet port.

It’s also a very portable little computer, especially compared to desktop computers, even with its smaller form factors. Speaking of computers, yes, technically we could have gotten a PC for the money we paid for a Mac. A quick online check shows we could have built a Ryzen 9 5900X with 12GB Nvidia RTX 3060 and 32GB of RAM for just under a Mac Studio.

But this machine will be much bigger and louder and ultimately won’t give us the experience we want. We’ve never found Windows to be really bad, but ARM-based Macs are a better fit in our workflow.


Ports, harbors, harbors

Ports, harbors, harbors

Ports, harbors, harbors

So how does Mac Studio help? The studio’s biggest gain is time. We work on about 3-4 videos per week, about 14 videos per month. Each video requires different types of work – from cropping and color grading to shaky stabilization and finally rendering the video and the things in between – creating a YouTube thumbnail and performing other work-related tasks.

We watch every video for bugs, and sometimes, not often, we have to view a clip multiple times. Hey, sometimes we have to redo an entire video because the manufacturer has implanted a major last minute firmware update to fix something on the device. It all accounts for the minutes, hours, and days we spend on our computers editing videos. Mac Studio saves us a lot of time.

We have an Apple Mac Studio base for our YouTube channel

To put things into perspective, we ran our regular video production on Mac Studio and MacBook Air, side by side, and compared the results. The studio has a huge raw power advantage over the air, but for normal tasks like cold starting the computer or opening DaVinci Resolve, the M1 and M1 Max processors aren’t much different. Of course, Mac Studio will start DaVinci Resolve just as quickly the first time and every time after, while MacBook Air will take longer on the first boot.

When installing a 26-second clip, the processing asymmetry is revealed. It took 14 seconds from Mac Studio – three times faster than the Air. The trend continues in export times for our full GSMArena video review – the Mac Studio was three times faster than the MacBook Air.

A note about the power derived from these machines. The MacBook Air consumes a maximum of 35 watts when exporting, while the Mac Studio draws about 75 watts, which is well below the estimated maximum of 370 watts. Fans were never audible, which is a definite benefit of Apple’s transition to a more efficient ARM architecture.

Combining the time saved during tasks like installing, rendering and exporting, we can approximate about 14 minutes per video saved using Mac Studio on MacBook Air. Multiplying that by 14 videos, on average, we make in one month, we get a file Total time saved 196 minutes per month Using Mac Studio as your primary video computer. That’s about three and a half hours that we save using the fastest machine every month. That’s an annual gain of 39 hours, which equates to about 5 standard working days per year.

macOS boot time

The more the better


  • AppleMacStudio

    16.3 seconds


  • Apple MacBook Air

    16.8 seconds

DaVinci Resolve 17.4.6 Boot time, first boot

The more the better


  • AppleMacStudio

    5 seconds


  • Apple MacBook Air

    17 seconds

DaVinci Resolve 17.4.6 Boot time, second boot

The more the better


  • AppleMacStudio

    4 seconds


  • Apple MacBook Air

    5 seconds

DaVinci Resolve 17.4.6, 26sec clip install

The more the better


  • AppleMacStudio

    14 seconds


  • Apple MacBook Air

    47 seconds

DaVinci Resolve 17.4.6, 10:39 min Export clip (Apple iPhone 13 Pro Max review)

The more the better


  • AppleMacStudio

    3:56 minutes


  • Apple MacBook Air

    13: 48 minutes

DaVinci Resolve 17.4.6, 11:15 min Export clip (Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra tested)

The more the better


  • AppleMacStudio

    7: 17 minutes


  • Apple MacBook Air

    24:08 minutes

In all, moving from MacBook Air to Mac Studio saves us roughly 40 hours a year, just because of the M1 Max’s faster computing power. This does not take into account all the other ways this device can be used for our purposes here at GSMArena.com.

While we were working on Mac Studio, we had no problems. Videos play well in native 4K, and there are no noticeable issues with adding color correction or animation and titles.

We have an Apple Mac Studio base for our YouTube channel

For us, this investment is worth it. We plan to use Mac Studio as a mainstay for video production for years to come. Mac reliability is legendary and proven right here at GSMArena headquarters.

As for our reliable MacBook Air, we also plan to continue using it for years to come. We trusted him a few months ago and he has proven himself. It’s a small machine that weighs almost nothing and is an invaluable tool to have on the go.

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